Consumerism in food

Honors Thesis Abstract The eating habits of society as a whole have drastically changed over the last few decades. The influx of technology, advertising, images in the media and changes within modern cultural and family values play a big role in the psychological evolution of consumers in the food service industry.

Consumerism in food

You ask if they really need that, they chuckle and say "no, no, of course not. The truth is, we have very limited real needs. Much of the debate over how to address the economic crisis has focused on a single word: And it's easy to understand why.

Bad behavior by a variety of businesses landed us in this mess -- so it seems rather obvious that the way to avoid future economic meltdowns is to create, and vigorously enforce, new rules proscribing such behavior. But the truth is quite a bit more complicated. The world economy consists of billions of transactions every day.

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There can never be enough inspectors, accountants, customs officers and police to ensure that all or even most of these transactions are properly carried out.

Moreover, those charged with enforcing regulations are themselves not immune to corruption, and hence, they too must be supervised and held accountable to others -- and so on. You can see how regulation cannot by itself resolve the problem.

What is needed instead is something far more sweeping: The normative values of a culture matter. Regulation is needed when culture fails, but it cannot alone serve as the mainstay of good conduct. But what kind of transformation in our normative culture is called for? What needs to be eradicated, or at least greatly tempered, is consumerism: This is not the same thing as capitalism, nor is it the same thing as consumption.

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To explain the difference, it is useful to draw on Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of human needs. At the bottom of this hierarchy are basic creature comforts; once these are sated, more satisfaction is drawn from affection, self-esteem and, finally, self-actualization. As long as consumption is focused on satisfying basic human needs -- safety, shelter, food, clothing, health care, education -- it is not consumerism.

But when, on attempts to satisfy these higher needs through the simple acquisition of goods and services, consumption turns into consumerism -- and consumerism becomes a social disease.

The link to the economic crisis should be obvious. A culture in which the urge to consume dominates the psychology of citizens is a culture in which people will do most anything to acquire the means to consume -- working slavish hours, behaving rapaciously in their business pursuits, and even bending the rules in order to maximize their earnings.

They will also buy homes beyond their means and think nothing of running up credit-card debt. It therefore seems safe to say that consumerism is, as much as anything else, responsible for the current economic mess. But consumerism will not just magically disappear from its central place in our culture.

It needs to be supplanted by something. A shift away from consumerism, and toward this something else, would obviously be a dramatic change for American society.

But such grand cultural changes are far from unprecedented. Profound transformations in the definition of "the good life" have occurred throughout human history. Before the spirit of capitalism swept across much of the world, neither work nor commerce were highly valued pursuits -- indeed, they were often delegated to scorned minorities such as Jews.

For centuries in aristocratic Europe and Japan, making war was a highly admired profession. In China, philosophy, poetry, and brush painting were respected during the heyday of the literati.

Religion was once the dominant source of normative culture; then, following the Enlightenment, secular humanism was viewed in some parts of the world as the foundation of society.

Such normative change is possible, especially in times of crisis. To accomplish this sort of change, we do not have to give up on capitalism itself.

This position does not call for a life of sackcloth and ashes, nor of altruism. And it does not call on poor people or poor nations to be content with their fate and learn to love their misery; clearly, the capitalist economy must be strong enough to provide for the basic creature comforts of all people.

But it does call for a new balance between consumption and other human pursuits. There is strong evidence that when consumption is used to try to address higher needs -- that is, needs beyond basic creature comforts -- it is ultimately Sisyphean. In the United States since World War II, per capita income has tripledbut levels of life satisfaction remain about the same, while the people of Japan, despite experiencing a sixfold increase in income sincehave seen their levels of contentment stay largely stagnant.

Studies also indicate that many members of capitalist societies feel unsatisfied, if not outright deprived, however much they earn and consume, because others make and spend even more:Abstract. The eating habits of society as a whole have drastically changed over the last few decades.

The influx of technology, advertising, images in the media and changes within modern cultural and family values play a big role in the psychological evolution of consumers in the food service industry.

Information on food safety and nutrition for consumers. food-related health issues that plague our society by looking at the trends in consumerism, and how they can be altered to benefit the well-being of our country. K e l l e r | 5. The eating habits of society as a whole have drastically changed over the last few decades.

The influx of technology, advertising, images in the media and changes within modern cultural and family values play a big role in the psychological evolution of consumers in the food service industry. My goal is to discover how the images in .

Food marketing undermines the efforts of parents, teachers and doctors to teach children about healthy eating. The onslaught of advertisements for fast foods, sugary foods and salty foods encourage children to favour such foods over more healthy and natural alternatives, such as fruit and vegetables.

This section on the alphabetnyc.com web site provides an insight into deeper issues of consumption and consumerism. Global Issues. Social, Political, Economic and Environmental Issues That Affect Us All.

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Consumerism in food

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Consumerism | Definition of Consumerism by Merriam-Webster